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Neuroscience and Brain Science at the Cambridge Science Festival

Throughout the festival

Baby-mum brain interaction: hands-on brains-on experience

Monday 14 March: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Tuesday 15 March: 10:00am - 12:00pm

Wednesday 16 March: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Friday 18 March: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Department of Experimental Psychology, Downing Street, CB2 3EB

Do you feel ‘in tune’ with your baby? How does play help your baby to learn? Why is face-to-face interaction so important for babies?

What do we think when we think of nothing?

Monday 14 March: 2:00pm - 6:00pm

Tuesday 15 March: 2:00pm - 6:00pm

Wednesday 16 March: 2:00pm - 6:00pm

Thursday 17 March: 2:00pm - 6:00pm

Friday 18 March: 2:00pm - 6:00pm

Department of Experimental Psychology, Downing Street, CB2 3EB

The Consciousness and Cognition Lab on your brain “at rest”, or the lack of such thing. This is a dry-electrodes EEG 20 minutes experience where participants are given different instructions to think “in nothing” (includes data collection), and watch their brainwaves afterwards. Discussion and the opportunity to see your thinking... or not.

Monday 7 March

Will artificial intelligence be superior to the human brain?

Monday 7 March: 7:30pm - 9:00pm

Mill Lane Lecture Rooms , 8 Mill Lane, CB2 1RW

The questions are will artificial intelligence be superior to the human brain? Can artificial intelligence ever be as creative as the human brain? And will artificial intelligence contribute to the benefit of society?

Friday 11 March

Your irrational brain: how we really make decisions -

Friday 11 March: 6:00pm - 7:00pm

Mill Lane Lecture Rooms , 8 Mill Lane, CB2 1RW

Do you think you make rational decisions? Think again... Ginny Smith turns your understanding of your brain upside down - and may even improve your decision-making!

Tuesday 15 March

Intelligence and learning in brains and machines

Tuesday 15 March: 6:00pm - 7:00pm

Mill Lane Lecture Rooms , 8 Mill Lane, CB2 1RW

What is intelligence? What is learning? Can we build computers and robots that learn? How much information does the brain store? How does mathematics help us answer these questions?

Saturday 12 March

Hands-on cognition café: five user-friendly test your brain stations

Saturday 12 March: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Department of Experimental Psychology, Downing Street, CB2 3EB

See how you perform on a range of cognitive tests, against yourself, others and against the world. An opportunity for you to learn more about you though science

What do you think you prefer in life: the secret of decision making

Saturday 12 March: 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Department of Experimental Psychology, Downing Street, CB2 3EB

Dr Benedetto De Martino's Lab goal is to develop a mechanistic understanding of how the brain constructs the values used to guide choice in the mist of uncertainty.

What can a tiny nervous system do?

Saturday 12 March: 3:30pm - 4:30pm

Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Anatomy Building, Downing Site Downing Street, CB2 3DY

This talk will present work from Paloma Gonzalez-Bellido's laboratory aimed at understanding just what small visually guided invertebrate predatory species detect and how their brains process the necessary information to catch their pray.

From small bugs to big baboons

Saturday 12 March: 11:00am - 4:00pm

Department of Zoology, Basement Seminar Room, Downing Street, CB2 3EJ

See how scientists are using the eggs, brains, hearing organs of insects to learn more about how the human body works.

Smells in the brain, and it is bliss...

Saturday 12 March: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Department of Experimental Psychology, Downing Street, CB2 3EB

How do you think you smell? What does it matter? Do you smell when you are asleep? Take part in smell experiments and find out more about the cognition of olfaction with Anat Arzi, Department of Psychology. Includes a big section on busting neuromyths.

Seeing is believing: zebrafish as a see-through model for biomedical research

Saturday 12 March: 10:00am - 4:00pm

Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Anatomy Building, Downing Site Downing Street, CB2 3DY

The Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience will be showing the amazing movies you can make from imaging these fish live. These movies can help us see, in real time, how cells divide and move to make the adult fish, how organs and blood vessels are formed. We will also have small microscopes for you to have a look at these fish samples yourself.

How to improve your brain

Saturday 12 March: 2:00pm - 4:00pm

Department of Experimental Psychology, Downing Street, CB2 3EB

Which of these things do you think most affects your brain health? Six Dragon’s Den-style five-minute pitches where cognitive scientists make the case for a specific lifestyle change (e.g. go vegetarian, stop smoking, meditate, give up alcohol, do brain training, take up running). Bring your questions!

Wednesday 16 March

Brain, body and mind: new directions in the neuroscience and philosophy of consciousness

Wednesday 16 March: 8:00pm - 9:00pm

Mill Lane Lecture Rooms , 8 Mill Lane, CB2 1RW

How conscious is my dog? Can robots become conscious? Are people in a vegetative state conscious? Philosopher Professor Tim Crane and neuroscientist Dr Srivas Chennu look into our minds and wrestle with the meaning of what it is to be conscious.

Exploring the mind and brain

Wednesday 16 March: 6:00pm - 8:30pm

MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, CB2 7EF

The evening held at the Cognition and Brain Science Unit at Chaucer Road will, for the first hour (18.00 - 19.00), consist of a range of practical demonstrations of experiments for all to try out. From 19.00- 20.30 There will be three half hour talks, with plenty of time for questions, from our scientists about the research being carried out at the Unit.

Thursday 17 March

The Cambridge Neuroscience Public Lecture - The treatment of dementia: new directions

Thursday 17 March: 5:30pm - 6:30pm

Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience, Physiological Laboratory, Downing Site Downing Street, CB2 3DY

Giovanna Mallucci is the van Geest Professor of Clinical Neurosciences at the University of Cambridge and is also a practising neurologist, specialising in dementia and neurodegenerative diseases. Her research interests are in understanding how brain cells die in diseases like Alzheimer’s for development of new therapies.

Friday 18 March

Pictures of You

Friday 18 March: 5:00pm - 7:30pm

MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit, 15 Chaucer Road, CB2 7EF

Pictures of You is a play inspired by the ‘mental imagery’, emotion and the study and treatment of bipolar disorder.

Saturday 19 March

The scientific secrets of Doctor Who

Saturday 19 March: 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, CB1 1PT

The science of out-of-body experiences

Saturday 19 March: 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, CB1 1PT

Out-of-body experiences, in which one’s self seems to leave one’s physical body, are commonly associated with near-death experiences, but can occur in many other situations, with various causes.

The multiple faces of the brain

Saturday 19 March: 2:00pm - 6:00pm

Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, CB1 1PT

How are illusions perceived by the brain? Explore what happens when you touch, see and hear illusions. Find out how our body reacts when the brain recognizes different stimuli such as smiling and seeing attractive faces as compared to fearful or angry faces. And have a go at assembling a model of a brain. With the Department of Psychology, Anglia Ruskin University.

Sunday 20 March

Meet your brain

Sunday 20 March: 11:00am - 12:00pm

UTC Cambridge, Robinson Way, CB2 0SZ

What do you know about the workings of your brain? By creating a giant 'neuron' live on stage, Naked Scientist Ginny Smith explores how nerve cells communicate and how we can hijack their signals so one human can control the movements of another. 

How your body works with Napp Pharmaceuticals

Sunday 20 March: 11:00am - 4:00pm

Deakin Centre, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, CB2 0QQ

Napp Pharmaceuticals and Mundipharma Science Ambassadors will take you through a journey of how our bodies work, with hands-on activities including finding out what different parts of our brains do and making your very own 'brain hat' to wear with pride!

A tour around your ear and hearing brain

Sunday 20 March: 12:00pm - 12:45pm

Clinical School, Lecture Theatre Two, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, CB2 0SP

Dr David Baguley takes us on the journey of sound from ear to brain (and back again) and many of the issues that can arise when things go wrong.

Of mice and men: a solution to the problem of diagnosing early Alzheimer’s disease

Sunday 20 March: 2:30pm - 3:15pm

Clinical School, Lecture Theatre 2, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, CB2 0SP

There is an unmet need for a simple and accurate diagnostic test for early Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This need can be met by using tests that reflect the functions of the entorhinal cortex (EC) and hippocampus, brain regions affected from the first stages of AD and which are involved in spatial navigation and memory.

Sex, food and smell

Sunday 20 March: 12:45pm - 1:45pm

UTC Cambridge, Robinson Way, CB2 0SZ

Dr Greg Jefferis is a Group Leader at the Medical Research Council's Laboratory of Molecular Biology who uses cutting edge biological and computing technology to explore how pheromones regulate courtship and how behaviours are encoded in brain wiring.

21st Century brain

Sunday 20 March: 11:00am - 3:00pm

Deakin Centre, Cambridge Biomedical CampusHills Road, CB2 0QQ

The human brain is the most complex structure known to man. Your brain contains almost 100 billion nerve cells that work together to control your behaviour, movement and personality. Alzheimer's Research UK use computer games, as well as hands-on challenges, to help you explore this mind-blowing organ, how it works and how it’s affected by dementia.

Find out more about Alzheimer's Research UK and the research we fund at: http://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org
Our website with information written with children in mind can be found at: www.dementiaexplained.org

Brain injury and new technology

Sunday 20 March: 1:00pm - 2:15pm

Clinical School, Lecture Theatre Two, Cambridge Biomedical Campus, CB2 0SP

How can technology address the problems of brain injuries, from prevention to rehabilitation?  The NIHR Brain Injury Healthcare Technology Co-operative introduces a set of new technological solutions.

 

 

 

 

Posted on 17/02/2016

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