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  • Keyword: neural circuit

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  • Michael Bate Professor Michael Bate
    My research is concerned with the way in which the machinery underlying coordinated movement is genetically specified and assembled during embryonic development. On the one hand this involves an analysis of the way in which muscles are assembled, ...
  • Dr Barry Bentley
    My current research aims to map and understand the extrasynaptic volume transmission networks in the nervous system of C. elegans.
  • Jimena Berni Dr Jimena Berni
    My research is concerned with the way the neuronal network underlying locomotor behaviour assembles during embryonic development. In particular I am focussing in the mechanisms that contribute to the stability and reliability of the neuronal circu...
  • Mario de Bono Dr Mario de Bono
    We seek to understand how neural networks are assembled, function and evolve. C. elegans is a powerful system to study neural circuits. The worm has exactly 302 neurons each of which can be identified. EM reconstructions have identified synapti...
  • Steve Edgley Dr Steve Edgley
    I’m interested in how movements are controlled. Our everyday movements are performed with little conscious thought and are remarkably precise. Despite what the textbooks tell you, the way in which this is accomplished is poorly understood. I work ...
  • Stephen Eglen Dr Stephen Eglen
    I use computational tools to help investigate mechanisms of neural development. In particular, I study the formation of retinotopic maps and retinal mosaics in vertebrate visual systems. In addition, I am interested in the analysis of large-scale...
  • Dana Galili Dr Dana Galili
    Did you ever wonder what makes males and females respond differently to the same stimulus? Sex differences are basic for reproduction, parenting and other social interactions. I work on Drosophila sexually dimorphic behaviours and their underlying...
  • Zoubin Ghahramani Professor Zoubin Ghahramani
    My current research interests include Bayesian approaches to machine learning, artificial intelligence, statistics, information retrieval, bioinformatics, and computational motor control. Statistics provides the mathematical foundations for handli...
  • Roger Hardie Professor Roger Hardie
    Phototransduction, TRP channels and Calcium signalling in Drosophila Phototransduction in the fruitfly Drosophila is an important model for G-protein coupled signalling and fascinating in its own right. We study the underlying cellular and molecu...
  • William Harris Professor William Harris
    Where does the nervous system come from in the embryo? How does it grow to the right size and shape? How do stem cells turn into more committed neuronal progenitors and how do these cells know when to leave the cycle and differentiate into neural ...
  • Michael Hastings FMedSci Dr Michael Hastings FRS, FMedSci
    Cellular and molecular basis to circadian rhythms in mammals and its relevance to metabolic and neurological disease.
  • Berthold Hedwig Dr Berthold Hedwig
    I analyse the neural mechanisms underlying acoustic communication in insects which use species-specific sounds for mate attraction. I use behavioural, neurophysiological and optical imaging techniques with the aim to understand: 1. The neural mech...
  • Sean Holden Dr Sean Holden
    Our research covers assorted issues in both theoretical and applied machine learning. At present we are interested in: - Computational learning theory. How can we better understand the properties of machine learning algorithms in terms of, for ex...
  • Christine Holt Professor Christine Holt FMedSci FRS
    My laboratory studies how nerve connections are first established in the brain. We focus on the developing visual system and our main goal is to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of axon guidance that enable axons to navigate from t...
  • Susan Jones Dr Susan Jones
    The primary focus of our research is the function of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors at excitatory synapses in the brain. We study the properties of glutamate receptors, glutamatergic synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity. We are intere...
  • Barry Keverne Professor Barry Keverne
    Professor Keverne has long standing experience in behavioural neuroscience and has, in the past 10 years, brought molecular genetic techniques to focus on brain development and investigate how genetic perturbations of the brain influence brain fun...
  • Johannes Kohl Dr Johannes Kohl
    Neural circuits underlying social behaviours
  • Dina Kronhaus Dr Dina Kronhaus
    My research is focused on studying connectivity and neural re-organisation, in the human brain, using theoretical modelling techniques to complement analysis of experimental data. I aim to identify overlapping yet distinct neural circuits implicat...
  • Simon Laughlin Professor Simon Laughlin
    Our group is interested in discovering design principles that govern the structure and function of neurons and neural circuits. We record from well-defined neurons, mainly in flies’ visual systems, to measure the molecular and cellular factors tha...
  • Máté Lengyel Professor Máté Lengyel
    I study learning and memory from computational, algorithmic/representational and neurobiological viewpoints. I also maintain an active interest in the possible computational functions of neural oscillations, particularly those present in the hippo...
  • Brian McCabe Dr Brian McCabe
    The neural mechanisms of learning and memory, particularly imprinting in the domestic chick. The young of many species, when exposed to a conspicuous object, rapidly learn the object's characteristics and subsequently narrow their social preferenc...
  • Professor John Mollon
    My research interests are in the visual perception of colour, motion, form and depth; the genetic basis for individual variations in perception; the nature of the information carried by the cerebral bus; and the history of neuroscience and of colo...
  • Cahir O'Kane Dr Cahir O'Kane
    We are interested in the basic biology of axonal ER, and its relevance to neurodegenerative disease, using Drosophila as a model. Axonal ER forms a continuous tubular network throughout the neuron, comparable to a “neuron within a neuron”, potenti...
  • Birgitta  Olofsson Dr Birgitta Olofsson
    How does an animal evaluate food and how is this information used to modify its feeding behaviour appropriately? In many animals food provides a reinforcing feedback after it is eaten that influences subsequent food-seeking behaviour. Variation ...
  • David Parker Dr David Parker
    We examine cellular and synaptic properties in neuronal networks using the lamprey spinal cord locomotor network as a model system. While this network is claimed, and often cited, as being characterised, there are actually significant gaps in our ...
  • Roy Patterson Dr Roy Patterson
    We have developed a computational model of the auditory signal processing that transforms a sound wave into the auditory image you hear in response to that sound wave. We investigate how the cochlea and neural centres in the auditory pathway proce...
  • Ole Paulsen Professor Ole Paulsen
    The primary interest of my group is the relationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity. Network oscillations naturally organise spike timing conducive to spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), a strong candidate for a mechani...
  • Hugh Robinson Dr Hugh Robinson
    We study synaptic integration in mammalian cortical neurons - encoding of synaptic inputs into patterns of action potentials, or spikes. We are currently interested in - development of advanced electrical stimulation techniques (conductan...
  • Lisa Saksida Dr Lisa Saksida
    We are working toward a better understanding of the psychological processes underlying memory and perception through a programme of theoretically-driven experimental research using both healthy subjects and brain-damaged populations. Research in m...
  • Wolfram Schultz Professor Wolfram Schultz
    Our group is interested to relate the mechanics of brain activity to measurable behaviour. We combine neurophysiological, imaging and behavioural techniques to investigate the neural correlates of goal-directed. We are interested in outcome value ...
  • Yoshiro Shiba Yoshiro Shiba
    Anxiety and fear are adaptive responses against a potential/imminent threat. These consist of changes in physiological (heart rate, blood pressure, endocrine responses etc.), cognitive (attention, vigilance etc.) and behavioural (flight, freeze, f...
  • David Tolhurst Dr David Tolhurst
    Visual coding of natural scenes. Information coding in the visual cortex studied by single unit recording, computational models and psychophysical discrimination by human observers. Visual deficits in developmental or acquired visual abnormality.
  • Anthony Tsang Dr Anthony Tsang
    Along the major research interest of Dr Blouet's group, my current research focus involves characterising amino acid sensing metabolic neural circuits, both anatomically and functionally. However, during my postgraduate studies, I received solid ...
  • Mr Samuel White
    I am working for a PhD in the Galliano Lab, studying neuronal plasticity in the olfactory bulb. I am using electrophysiology and a range of histological and imaging techniques to study the induced homeostatic changes of plastic cellular and subcel...
  • Dr Ian Winter
    Primitive neural mechanisms of auditory scene analysis. My research searches for neurophysiological correlates of the cues necessary for the segregation and fusion of auditory objects. This work is carried out in close collaboration with psychop...
  • Daniel Wolpert Professor Daniel Wolpert FMedSci FRS
    The group uses engineering approaches to understand how the human brain controls movement. The work includes both computational modelling and experimental approaches using robotic and virtual reality interfaces. Research areas include motor planni...
  • Buyun Zhao Buyun Zhao
    The ultimate function of the nervous system is to facilitate survival. To accomplish this task in a dynamically changing environment, the animal's behavioural strategies must alter accordingly given its context. One of the fundamental basis of thi...

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