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  • Department: Zoology

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  • Michael Bate Professor Michael Bate
    My research is concerned with the way in which the machinery underlying coordinated movement is genetically specified and assembled during embryonic development. On the one hand this involves an analysis of the way in which muscles are assembled, ...
  • Howard Baylis Dr Howard Baylis
    We are investigating the functions of genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease using C. elegans. We have focussed on presenilin genes as presenilin mutations in human cause familial Alzheimer’s disease. We aim to address the mechanism by which presen...
  • Jimena Berni Dr Jimena Berni
    My research is concerned with the way the neuronal network underlying locomotor behaviour assembles during embryonic development. In particular I am focussing in the mechanisms that contribute to the stability and reliability of the neuronal circu...
  • Paul Brooks Paul Brooks
    My area of research focuses on how the cellular skeleton is formed and maintained in peripheral neurons. Fundamentally, microtubules are comprised of just 3 proteins, however, their functions are diverse. During cell division MTs lock onto and pu...
  • Malcolm Burrows Professor Malcolm Burrows
    I work on the properties of neurons and the circuits they form to understand how they control behaviour. 1. Motor control. How do nonspiking local interneurons organise motor neurons to generate limb movements? How do spiking interneurons proce...
  • Dr Marta Costa
    I am the Project Team Leader for the Drosophila Connectomics group, started in October 2016, aims to build the adult olfactory connectome of Drosophila. That is, to describe every neuron that is involved in olfactory behaviour, and its connection...
  • Dr Sarah Crisp
    My goal is to advance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying neurological diseases associated with autoantibodies. These diseases include forms of encephalitis, epilepsy, demyelination, movement disorders and peripheral neuropathies amongs...
  • Miss Amelia Edmondson-Stait
    The mushroom body (MB) is the principal site of associative learning in insects. MB output neurons (MBONs) divide it into 15 compartments and together form a complex, multi-layered network whose combined activity represents valence and motivationa...
  • Caroline Fabre Dr Caroline Fabre C.G.
    Substrate-borne communication during Drosophila courtship
  • Berthold Hedwig Dr Berthold Hedwig
    I analyse the neural mechanisms underlying acoustic communication in insects which use species-specific sounds for mate attraction. I use behavioural, neurophysiological and optical imaging techniques with the aim to understand: 1. The neural mech...
  • Christy Hung
    Neurons are one of the most polarized cells in our body, with their axonal processes sometimes extending distances of more than 1,000-fold the diameter of their cell body. I am interested to study how proteins and organelles are delivered to axons...
  • Barry Keverne Professor Barry Keverne
    Professor Keverne has long standing experience in behavioural neuroscience and has, in the past 10 years, brought molecular genetic techniques to focus on brain development and investigate how genetic perturbations of the brain influence brain fun...
  • Matthias Landgraf Dr Matthias Landgraf
    We seek to understand how neural networks are specified and how they assemble during development. The locomotor network of the Drosophila embryo and larva serves as a powerful experimental model. Composed of identified neurons whose connections ha...
  • Simon Laughlin Professor Simon Laughlin
    Our group is interested in discovering design principles that govern the structure and function of neurons and neural circuits. We record from well-defined neurons, mainly in flies’ visual systems, to measure the molecular and cellular factors tha...
  • Brian McCabe Dr Brian McCabe
    The neural mechanisms of learning and memory, particularly imprinting in the domestic chick. The young of many species, when exposed to a conspicuous object, rapidly learn the object's characteristics and subsequently narrow their social preferenc...
  • Miss Kimberly Meechan
    Our group studies neural circuits involved in olfaction in Drosophila. Some neurons involved in these circuits are known to be sexually dimorphic. How these differences lead to different behaviours in male and female flies is not well understood. ...
  • Dr Nicholas Mundy
    We study the evolutionary genetics of brain size and sensory systems in primates. In particular, we are interested in the evolution and selection of colour vision polymorphisms in New World monkeys and lemurs, the evolution of vomeronasal recept...
  • Alister Nicol Dr Alister Nicol
    Neuronal encoding in learning and memory
  • Birgitta  Olofsson Dr Birgitta Olofsson
    How does an animal evaluate food and how is this information used to modify its feeding behaviour appropriately? In many animals food provides a reinforcing feedback after it is eaten that influences subsequent food-seeking behaviour. Variation ...
  • Temur Yunusov Dr Temur Yunusov
    Locomotion in Drosophila melanogaster larva requires coordinated output of motorneurons that drive the contractions of the body wall muscles. The dendrites of motorneurons in the Ventral Nerve Cord are oganised to form a 'myotopic' representation ...
  • Maarten Zwart Mr Maarten Zwart
    Dendrites are the postsynaptic structures of neurons, specialised to receive and integrate inputs from other cells. The dendritic geometry, regulated by intrinsic programmes of cell type specification and extrinsic factors during development, crit...

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