Frank Hezemans

Frank Hezemans

University position

PhD student
Supervised by James Rowe

Departments

Institutes

MRC Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit

Email

Frank.Hezemans@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk

Home page

http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/people/... (personal home page)

Research Theme

Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience

Interests

I study the cognitive and neural mechanisms with which we plan and control action, in health and after the development of dementia. The control of action depends on the integration of predicted consequences of action with sensory information, modulated by experience. As the brain changes with normal ageing or disease (such as dementia), the essential sensorimotor integration and the use of experience are impaired. In addition to affecting learning and control of action, a consequence of these changes can be apathy. I use psychophysical and cognitive tools, in combination with modelling and neuroimaging, to develop a mechanistic account of apathy.

Research Focus

Keywords

perception & action

apathy

predictive coding

cortical hierarchy

Bayesian

Clinical conditions

Dementia

Movement disorders

Parkinson's disease

Equipment

Behavioural analysis

Computational modelling

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Pupillometry

Collaborators

Cambridge

Claire O'Callaghan

Noham Wolpe

Associated News Items


    Key publications

    Hezemans FH, Wolpe N, Rowe JB (2020), “Apathy is associated with reduced precision of prior beliefs about action outcomes” Journal of Experimental Psychology: General

    Publications

    2020

    Gillan CM, Vaghi MM, Hezemans FH, van Ghesel Grothe S, Dafflon J, Brühl AB, Savulich G, Robbins TW (2020), “Experimentally-induced and real-world anxiety have no demonstrable effect on goal-directed behaviour” Psychological Medicine

    Wolpe, N, Hezemans, FH, Rowe, JB (2020), “Alien limb syndrome: A Bayesian account of unwanted actions” Cortex

    2019

    Savulich G, Hezemans FH, van Ghesel Grothe S, Dafflon J, Schulten N, Brühl AB, Sahakian BJ, Robbins TW (2019), “Acute anxiety and autonomic arousal induced by CO2 inhalation impairs prefrontal executive functions in healthy humans” Translational Psychiatry