Systems & Computational
Developmental
Cognitive & Behavioural
Clinical & Veterinary
Cellular & Molecular
Cellular & Molecular

The study of the behaviour of neurons at the cellular and molecular level has a long and distinguished tradition in Cambridge. Work on the cellular basis of sensation, developmental neurobiology, cell signalling, ion channels, neural degeneration and repair, and more integrative aspects of nervous system function are all strong areas in the School. Research spans a diverse spectrum from molecular signalling to neuroendocrinology to sensory and motor systems, with techniques used ranging from biochemical, single-cell recording and behavioural studies to large-scale computational methods. There are particular strengths in research on synaptic transmission, local network properties and sensory transduction, as well as a wealth of expertise at the Laboratory for Molecular Biology and the Sanger Institute.

Principal investigators

  • Sabine Bahn Professor Sabine Bahn
    The goals of the Bahn Laboratory are to develop molecular diagnostics for schizophrenia and other major neuropsychiatric disorders, to develop and test new hypotheses of the pathological basis of schizophrenia and bipolar affective disorder and to...
  • Roger Barker Professor Roger Barker
    I work on: Clinical aspects of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease including the study of disease heterogeneity using cognitive testing, functional imaging and genetic biomarkers. Examining the value of different biomarkers to assess disease onse...
  • Howard Baylis Dr Howard Baylis
    We are investigating the functions of genes involved in Alzheimer’s disease using C. elegans. We have focussed on presenilin genes as presenilin mutations in human cause familial Alzheimer’s disease. We aim to address the mechanism by which presen...
  • David Belin Dr David Belin
    Our research is interested in the neural, cellular and molecular substrates of inter-individual vulnerability to develop impulsive / compulsive disorders such as drug addiction, Obsessive / compulsive disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, pathological g...
  • Anne Bertolotti Dr Anne Bertolotti
    Diverse neurodegenerative diseases share a common cause: aggregation of a specific protein in selective regions of the brain. The disease-causing proteins are expressed throughout life but neurodegenerative diseases are mostly late-onset. In fac...
  • Dr Tiago Branco
    Our goal is to understand how the mouse brain implements the computations that underlie innate behaviours. We aim to provide biophysically detailed descriptions of how sensory inputs and motivational states are integrated to produce behavioural ou...
  • Andrea Brand Professor Andrea Brand FRS FMedSci
    Discovering how stem cells are maintained in a multipotent state and how their progeny differentiate into distinct cellular fates is a key step in the therapeutic use of stem cells to repair tissues after damage or disease. We are investigating th...
  • Sarah Bray Professor Sarah Bray
    We are interested in understanding the signalling pathways that co-ordinate the decisions made by cells during development. The ultimate fate of a cell is dictated in part by its heredity and in part through interactions with neighbouring cells. O...
  • Kevin Brindle Professor Kevin Brindle
    We have developed non-invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques that enable us to track labelled cells that have been implanted in the CNS. This work has been conducted in collaboration with Robin Franklin. In addition we are developi...
  • Guy Brown Professor Guy Brown
    We are interested in the mechanisms of inflammatory neurodegeneration in the brain. We have been using cultures of neurons and glia to investigate how microglia become activated by inflammatory stimuli (such as cytokines, LPS, LTA, prions and bet...
  • Raymond Bujdoso Dr Raymond Bujdoso
    Prion diseases such as scrapie of sheep and goats, BSE of cattle and CJD of humans are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases. The research of our prion group is concerned with providing knowledge to try and answer some of the important question...
  • Malcolm Burrows Professor Malcolm Burrows
    I work on the properties of neurons and the circuits they form to understand how they control behaviour. 1. Motor control. How do nonspiking local interneurons organise motor neurons to generate limb movements? How do spiking interneurons proce...
  • Philip Buttery Dr Philip Buttery
    We work on the role of rho family GTPases and their regulators in the plasticity of CNS synapses, as related to brain disease and recovery from brain injury. We are currently focussing on a regulator of the GTPase Rac1 which is upregulated with n...
  • Michael Coleman Dr Michael Coleman
    We lose 30-50% of our axons with age and more still in neurodegenerative disease, usually exceeding neuronal loss. In both, the mechanisms are poorly understood but the experimental axon injury model, resulting in Wallerian degeneration, has led t...
  • Tony Coll Dr Tony Coll
    My current research continues to focus upon the roles of the hypothalamus in the control of energy balance. Our current understanding of the central control of appetite has relied heavily upon mouse models and I continue to utilise the power of b...
  • William Colledge Professor William Colledge
    My research group is interested in the neuroendocrine regulation of mammalian fertility using transgenic mice as a model system. Puberty and the regulation of mammalian fertility is controlled by hormonal signalling within the hypothalamus. My re...
  • V. Peter Collins Professor V. Peter Collins
    The group is focusing on human brain tumours. The studies aim at documenting the genetic abnormalities involved in the development of these tumours and how these affect cell function. We wish to identify prognostic markers, therapy response marker...
  • Alastair Compston Professor Alastair Compston
    My research interests focus on clinical and experimental demyelinating disease with an emphasis on multiple sclerosis - the commonest potentially disabling disease of young adults. The research group has a broad set of interests: we work on the a...
  • Geoffrey Cook Dr Geoffrey Cook
    My research concerns the mechanisms controlling axon growth. In the laboratory we are investigating two axon-repulsive systems, 1) the characterization of somite glycoproteins that repel axons, creating the segmented pattern of spinal nerves durin...
  • Andrew Crawford Professor Andrew Crawford
    I am interested in biophysics and physiology of the vertebrate inner ear , especially the cochlea. My research has focussed on the electrophysiology of cochlear hair cells with a view to understanding how they manage to respond to nanometre dis...
  • Hannah Critchlow Dr Hannah Critchlow
    Hannah strips down the brain with the BBC broadcast Naked Scientists. Using Radio, on-line channels and live events she designs, produces and presents a neuroscience focused, interactive multimedia experience for the public. In 2014 Hannah was na...
  • Damian Crowther Dr Damian Crowther
    We use a range of in vitro and in vivo techniques to understand how amyloid protein aggregates: i) mediate their toxic effects and ii) underpin the pathological progression of disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. We are investigating the molecul...
  • Anthony Davenport Dr Anthony Davenport
    Our research group focuses on understanding the role of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, targets for about ~50% of current drugs) together with their transmitters in humans. We use in vitro pharmacology and in vivo imaging using positron emissi...
  • Mario de Bono Dr Mario de Bono
    We seek to understand how neural networks are assembled, function and evolve. C. elegans is a powerful system to study neural circuits. The worm has exactly 302 neurons each of which can be identified. EM reconstructions have identified synapti...
  • Christopher Dobson Professor Christopher Dobson
    Our group is investigating the molecular origins of neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease, that are characterised neuropathologically by the presence of amyloid fibrils. The aim of our research is to understand ...
  • Steve Edgley Dr Steve Edgley
    I’m interested in how movements are controlled. Our everyday movements are performed with little conscious thought and are remarkably precise. Despite what the textbooks tell you, the way in which this is accomplished is poorly understood. I work ...
  • Mike Edwardson Professor Mike Edwardson
    My research involves imaging of biomolecules using atomic force microscopy (AFM). AFM permits the visualization of single molecules under near-physiological conditions. Current projects include studies of: 1. The subunit arrangement in ionotropic...
  • Peter Evans Dr Peter Evans
    The research of my group is focussed on signalling mechanisms through 7-transmembrane spanning G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). We are currently specifically focussing our research on rapid non-genomic actions of steroids through GPCRs. We ha...
  • Mark Evans Dr Mark Evans
    My group are interested in (1) how brain detects changes in blood glucose and how this glucose-sensing interacts with peripheral metabolism; (2) how defences against hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar) may become abnormal in diabetes; (3) the short an...
  • James Fawcett Professor James Fawcett
    Axon regeneration in the damaged CNS: Regeneration of axons after CNS damage is blocked by several molecules in the environment and by loss of intrinsic regeneration ability, We modify the environment to make it more permissive and modify axonal ...
  • Rene Frank Dr Rene Frank
    I am interested in the molecular mechanisms that underly the acquisition of memory. The NMDA receptor and many other proteins with which it associates have been identified as essential players in the cognitive functions of learning and memory. My...
  • Robin Franklin Professor Robin Franklin
    Robin Franklin is Professor of Stem Cell Medicine and Head of Translational Science at the Wellcome Trust-MRC Cambridge Stem Cell Institute. His lab works on the mechanisms of CNS regeneration with a particular focus on remyelination, an adult ste...
  • Kristian Franze Dr Kristian Franze
    We are taking an interdisciplinary approach to investigate how cellular forces, local cell and tissue compliance and cellular mechanosensitivity contribute to CNS development and disease. Methods we are exploiting include atomic force microscopy, ...
  • Tim Fryer Dr Tim Fryer
    My research concentrates on positron emission tomography (PET) methodology, with particular emphasis on the quantitative accuracy of the physiological parameters derived from the data. Current research themes are: parametric mapping using b...
  • Michel Goedert Dr Michel Goedert
    Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease are characterized by the presence of abnormal filamentous assemblies within some nerve cells. Similar assemblies are found in related disorders, including progressive supranuclear palsy, dementia with Le...
  • Paloma T Gonzalez-Bellido Dr Paloma T Gonzalez-Bellido
    Given a set of environmental conditions and behavioral limitations, what is the optimal neural strategy and performance for a certain visual task? What adaptations are crucial for it? Are such adaptations widely spread across distantly related sp...
  • Ingo Greger Dr Ingo Greger
    Information transfer in the brain occurs at synapses where chemical transmitters are released from presynaptic terminals and are received by postsynaptic receptors. Glutamate is a major neurotransmitter and glutamate receptors are key to synaptic ...
  • Jules Griffin Dr Jules Griffin
    We have been using a range of analytical techniques, and in particular NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry, to follow metabolism in the brain in a range of disease processes. This ranges from flux measurements to understand the cycling of metab...
  • John Griffiths Professor John Griffiths
    My work involves the use and development of Magnetic Resonance methods for understanding the biology of cancer and the determination of tumour-associated MR parameters for diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of therapy.
  • Jochen Guck Dr Jochen Guck
    The paradigm that neurons in the CNS cannot regenerate is gone. While most research to date is biochemical, there are also physical aspects that need to be considered. We are developing tools to investigate axonal growth and to direct in a certain...
  • Roger Hardie Professor Roger Hardie
    Phototransduction, TRP channels and Calcium signalling in Drosophila Phototransduction in the fruitfly Drosophila is an important model for G-protein coupled signalling and fascinating in its own right. We study the underlying cellular and molecu...
  • William Harris Professor William Harris
    Where does the nervous system come from in the embryo? How does it grow to the right size and shape? How do stem cells turn into more committed neuronal progenitors and how do these cells know when to leave the cycle and differentiate into neural ...
  • Michael Hastings FMedSci Dr Michael Hastings FRS, FMedSci
    Cellular and molecular basis to circadian rhythms in mammals and its relevance to metabolic and neurological disease.
  • Christine Holt Professor Christine Holt FRS FMedSci
    My laboratory studies how nerve connections are first established in the brain. We focus on the developing visual system and our main goal is to understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms of axon guidance that enable axons to navigate from t...
  • Robin Irvine Professor Robin Irvine
    All my research centres around inositides, which fall into two groups, inositol lipids and inositol phosphates. Most of our work focuses on some of the kinases that phosphorylate inositides, and the functions of their substrates and products, incl...
  • Tony Jackson Dr Tony Jackson
    In neurones, voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels initiate the action potential. Sodium channels consist of a ~ 250 kDa alpha-subunit and ~40 kDa beta-subunits. The beta-subunits modulate channel gating. The Nav beta-subunits possess an extracellul...
  • Gregory Jefferis Dr Gregory Jefferis
    Our broad goal is to understand how smell turns into behaviour in the fruit fly brain. We use a combination of genetic labelling and manipulation, targeted in vivo whole cell patch clamp recording and high resolution neuroanatomy to study olfactor...
  • Susan Jones Dr Susan Jones
    The primary focus of our research is the function of AMPA and NMDA glutamate receptors at excitatory synapses in the brain. We study the properties of glutamate receptors, glutamatergic synaptic transmission, and synaptic plasticity. We are intere...
  • Clemens Kaminski Professor Clemens Kaminski
    We develop advanced microscopic imaging techniques that permit us to elucidate molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration. We use techniques such as lifetime, spectrum and polarisation resolved imaging that inform on protein misfolding, aggregat...
  • Ragnhildur Thora Karadottir Dr Ragnhildur Thora Karadottir
    My lab’s interests are neurotransmitter signalling to oligodendrocytes and their progenitor cells, in both health and disease. Oligodendrocytes produce myelin (in the CNS), which speeds the propagation of the action potential. When the myelin s...
  • Roger Keynes Professor Roger Keynes
    Growth cone repulsion is an important mechanism controlling axon growth. During development it guides axons by excluding them from repulsive regions of the embryo. Following injury to the adult brain it may also block axon regeneration, with major...
  • Professor David Klenerman
    Small soluble protein aggregates are thought to play a key role in the initial development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, but are difficult to study using conventional methods due to their low concent...
  • Dr Mark Kotter
    My group is interested in the biology of adult CNS stem and precursor cells in the context of disease. A particular focus lies on mechanisms of CNS remyelination, a stem/precursor cell-mediated process in which new myelin sheaths are restored to d...
  • Andras Lakatos Dr Andras Lakatos
    Andras is interested in the adaptive changes in glia-neuron interactions following remote axonal insults, such as axonal degeneration, injury and demyelination. The particular focus is how endogenous cortical/gray matter astrocytes and stem cells ...
  • Matthias Landgraf Dr Matthias Landgraf
    Development of neural networks - from the morphogenesis of dendritic trees to patterns of connections. As neuronal circuits form, synaptic terminals are delivered to specific regions of the nervous system so that connections can form between appr...
  • Simon Laughlin Professor Simon Laughlin
    Our group is interested in discovering design principles that govern the structure and function of neurons and neural circuits. We record from well-defined neurons, mainly in flies’ visual systems, to measure the molecular and cellular factors tha...
  • Nicolas Le Novere Dr Nicolas Le Novere
    My scientific interests revolve around signal transduction in neurons, ranging from the molecular structure of membrane proteins involved in neurotransmission to modelling signalling pathways. A strong focus is the molecular and cellular basis of ...
  • Rick Livesey Dr Rick Livesey
    During embryonic development, all of the neurons in the cerebral cortex, the executive and integrative centre of the mammalian brain, are generated from a complex population of multipotent stem and progenitor cells. We have developed methods for r...
  • Darren Logan Dr Darren Logan
    Our research interest is in understanding the molecular and genetic basis of olfaction, and how that influences behaviour. Our wider aim is to characterise the neural circuits that instruct stereotyped hard-wired behaviours, and investigate how th...
  • Sarah Lummis Professor Sarah Lummis
    My lab works on Cys-loop receptors, which are one of the major classes of ligand-gated ion channels. The family includes in its vertebrate members 5-HT3, nACh, GABAA, GABAC, and glycine receptors. Proteins from this family are critical for fast sy...
  • Keith Martin Professor Keith Martin
    The main goal of our group is to understand better the mechanisms of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) death in glaucoma, the leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide. We aim to develop methods to protect RGC thus slowing the progression of gla...
  • Hugh Matthews Dr Hugh Matthews
    Phototransduction and olfactory transduction. Calcium homeostasis in vertebrate photoreceptors and olfactory receptors, and its role in modulating their electrical responses to stimulation. Light-induced calcium release within the photoreceptor ou...
  • Harvey McMahon Dr Harvey McMahon FRS
    Molecular mechanisms of vesicle exocytosis, endocytosis and membrane trafficking in neurons. We are interested in understanding basic mechanisms of vesicle trafficking, especially at the synapse, where synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis ...
  • Su Metcalfe Dr Su Metcalfe
    The application of nanotechnology to healthcare - nano-medicine - is now recognised worldwide as a new era in clinical medicine. By loading biocompatible, biodegradable nano-particles with growth factor, and targeting to sites of tissue damage, a ...
  • Amy Milton Dr Amy Milton
    Memory is a critical function of the brain, but little is known about the mechanisms by which memories are modified, adapted, and persist. Memories are known to 'reconsolidate' undergoing updating and strengthening following their destabilisation ...
  • Dr Eric Miska
    We are interested in all aspects of gene regulation by regulatory RNA. Current research themes include: miRNA biology and pathology, miRNA mechanism, piRNA biology and the germline, endo-siRNAs in epigenetic inheritance and evironmental conditioni...
  • Emad Moeendarbary Dr Emad Moeendarbary
    I am a mechanical engineer by training with a strong interest in the experimental and ‎theoretical/computational study of biological systems. Presently, I am working at the ‎interface of engineering and neuroscience to study mechanics of neurons ...
  • Professor Jenny Morton
    Our research is focused on understanding the mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration and on developing strategies to delay or prevent the death of neurones in injured or degenerating brain, particularly in Huntington's disease. We are also interes...
  • Dr Nicholas Mundy
    We study the evolutionary genetics of brain size and sensory systems in primates. In particular, we are interested in the evolution and selection of colour vision polymorphisms in New World monkeys and lemurs, the evolution of vomeronasal recept...
  • Ruth Murrell-Lagnado Dr Ruth Murrell-Lagnado
    We are interested in the structure, function and cell biology of ion channels and in particular the P2X family of membrane receptors. These cation channels open on binding extracellular ATP, and are widely distributed throughout all major systems ...
  • John O'Brien Dr John O'Brien CBiol FSB
    Working on the application of improving biolistic delivery of getting DNA or fluorescent dyes into live cells. Biolistic transfection is proving an increasingly popular method of incorporating DNA or dyes into cells that are difficult to transfect...
  • Cahir O'Kane Dr Cahir O'Kane
    We use Drosophila as a model organism to study synapse function. Questions of major interest include the mechanisms of synaptic vesicle trafficking, and the roles of cellular trafficking pathways in the pathology of neurodegenerative diseases. Rec...
  • Stephen O'Rahilly Professor Stephen O'Rahilly FRS FMedSci
    My research has been concerned with the elucidation of the basic causes of obesity and Type 2 diabetes at a molecular level and the translation of those discoveries into improved diagnosis and therapy for patients. My work has uncovered several p...
  • Birgitta  Olofsson Dr Birgitta Olofsson
    How does an animal evaluate food and how is this information used to modify its feeding behaviour appropriately? In many animals food provides a reinforcing feedback after it is eaten that influences subsequent food-seeking behaviour. Variation ...
  • David Parker Dr David Parker
    My lab examines how interactions in neuronal networks generate behaviourally relevant network outputs, using the lamprey spinal cord locomotor network as a model system. We combine electrophysiological, computational, molecular, and anatomical app...
  • Ole Paulsen Professor Ole Paulsen
    The primary interest of my group is the relationship between network oscillations and synaptic plasticity. Network oscillations naturally organise spike timing conducive to spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP), a strong candidate for a mechani...
  • Roger Pedersen Professor Roger Pedersen
    Our principal objective is to define the molecular and genetic basis for the maintenance of the pluripotent status of human embryonic stem cells, and similarly, the basis for their differentiation into the primary body lineages: mesoderm, endoderm...
  • Anna Philpott Dr Anna Philpott
    Our laboratory is interested in understanding the coordination of cell proliferation with cell fate determination and differentiation in development, stem cells and reprogramming, focusing particularly on the nervous system (as well as in endocri...
  • Stefano Pluchino Dr Stefano Pluchino
    Recent evidence from our own laboratory indicates that the systemic injection of somatic neural stem/precursor cells (NPCs) very efficiently protect the CNS from the chronic degeneration induced by inflammation both in small rodents as well as in ...
  • Ruma Raha-Chowdhury Dr Ruma Raha-Chowdhury
    My main interest is in brain iron homeostasis, its role in normal ageing, neuronal inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. Iron is an essential nutrient for almost all living organisms but in excess is toxic. There is evidence that iron homeo...
  • Taufiq Rahman Dr Taufiq Rahman
    My research interests broadly lie in two categories - structure-function studies of intracellular calcium channels and rational design and development of selective modulators of signalling proteins including ion channels
  • Lucy Raymond Dr Lucy Raymond
    The group aims to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying intellectual disability in humans. Our main focus is on families with X linked disease. In collaboration with The Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, we are using a new approach to dise...
  • Akhilesh Reddy Dr Akhilesh Reddy
    My group is interested in circadian rhythms, which are daily cycles of physiology and behaviour that persist when organisms are isolated from the outside world. They represent a fundamental biological mechanism, and are present at all levels of li...
  • Evan Reid Dr Evan Reid
    My group's research is focussed on the hereditary spastic paraplegias, genetic conditions where the corticospinal tract axons degenerate. HSPs selectively involve axons while sparing the neuronal cell bodies, so we study them to understand molecul...
  • Rhys Roberts Dr Rhys Roberts
    Our group is interested in peripheral nerve diseases, particularly the inherited peripheral neuropathies, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT). We have focused on the demyelinating forms of CMT, where defects in intracellular membrane trafficking p...
  • Hugh Robinson Dr Hugh Robinson
    We study synaptic integration in mammalian cortical neurons - encoding of synaptic inputs into patterns of action potentials, or spikes. We are currently interested in - development of advanced electrical stimulation techniques (conductan...
  • David  Rubinsztein Professor David Rubinsztein
    The pathogenesis of diseases caused by codon reiteration mutations (like Huntington’s disease and oculopharangeal muscular dystrophy). Description of research: We are studying the pathogenesis of diseases caused by codon reiteration mutations, l...
  • Stephen Sawcer Professor Stephen Sawcer
    My group researches multiple sclerosis. We use genetic analysis to identify relevant variants and then attempt to understand the immunological and neurobiological consequences of these using expression studies and functional assays. As well as con...
  • William Schafer Dr William Schafer
    The fundamental nature of mental phenomena such as perception, learning and memory is one of the remaining scientific mysteries. Since the neuroanatomy of mammalian nervous systems is exceedingly complex and incompletely characterized, it is diffi...
  • Christof Schwiening Dr Christof Schwiening
    Electrical activity of neurones is associated with calcium influx through various channels. Most neurones extrude this calcium very rapidly on the plasma-membrane calcium pump (PMCA). Our research shows that this extrusion occurs in exchange for h...
  • Ben Simons Professor Ben Simons
    I am interested in applying methods of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics and population dynamics to lineage tracing studies to investigate mechanisms of stem cell fate in development and maintenance. As well as neurogenesis in adult mammalian ...
  • Ewan Smith Dr Ewan Smith
    The main interest of the Smith lab is to understand the molecular mechanisms by which sensory neurones detect noxious stimuli, so-called nociceptors. We are particularly interested in how acid activates nociceptors in both physiological and pathop...
  • Maria Grazia  Spillantini Professor Maria Grazia Spillantini FRS FMedSci
    Our interest is in the identification of the mechanisms leading to neuronal death and clinical phenotype in diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and frontotemporal dementia. In particular we study the role of microtubule-assoc...
  • Professor Peter St George-Hyslop
    My laboratory focuses upon understanding the causes and molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and Fronto-Temporal Dementia. We and others have shown that these diseases are frequently c...
  • David Tannahill Dr David Tannahill
    I have worked on a range of model systems from Xenopus and zebrafish to chicks and mice. My current research is focused on building an atlas that describes where and when large numbers of genes are expressed in the developing mouse embryo. For thi...
  • Colin Taylor Professor Colin Taylor
    Roles of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptors in generating intracellular calcium signals. Structural determinants of IP3 receptor behaviour. Decoding of calcium signals.
  • Roger Thomas Professor Roger Thomas
    Intracellular ion homeostasis in nerve cells. I use pH and Ca2+ sensitive microelectrodes to study ionic interactions inside large snail neurones. I am currently investigating the Ca:H coupling ratio of the plasma membrane Ca pump, or PMCA.
  • Andrew Thompson Dr Andrew Thompson
    I am an experienced neuroscientist / pharmacologist with exposure to a broad range of techniques. This has included the development of a simple and information-rich fluorometric microplate assay for simultaneously identifying novel agonists, antag...
  • Gergely Toth, EMBA Dr Gergely Toth MBA
    My research interests include the targeting of intrinsically disordered proteins by small molecules, which misfold and lose their native functions and/or gain toxic functions implicated in neurodegenerative diseases. We are working on multidisci...
  • nigel unwin Dr Nigel Unwin
    I am interested in finding out how ion channels work, using electron microscopy to analyse their structures trapped in different physiological states. Current research focuses on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor, the transmitter-gated ion chan...
  • Elizabeth Warburton Dr Elizabeth Warburton
    Research interests are as follows 1. Molecular imaging of atheroma - particularly carotid plaque imaging using PET/CT and MRI techniques. Both Clinical and microPET imaging. Proof of principle trials of novel atheroma drugs with imaging biomarker...
  • Colin Watts Dr Colin Watts
    Lab-based research is focused on the genomics of glioblastoma (GBM) and in the role of glial progenitors in their evolution and development. We are also interested in developing patient-specific models of GBM to evaluate intra-tumour variability i...
  • Dr Ian Winter
    Primitive neural mechanisms of auditory scene analysis. My research searches for neurophysiological correlates of the cues necessary for the segregation and fusion of auditory objects. This work is carried out in close collaboration with psychop...
  • Dr Peter Wooding
    Correlation between placental structure and function using light and electron microscopy for structure and immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridisation for function. The focus is mainly on ruminants but includes comparative studies on a wide vari...
  • Giles Yeo Dr Giles Yeo
    I study brain control of body-weight, and currently have two main aims: 1.) To determine a role for FTO in energy balance. SNPs in FTO are strongly associated with obesity. FTO is nutritionally regulated within the ARC, and modulating FTO expres...
  • Chao Zhao Dr Chao Zhao
    My research focuses on mechanism of remyelination of central nervous system following demyelination in various conditions. After demyelinating injury, the system activates a repair process, which involves oligodendrocyte progenitor cells turning i...