Dr Ian Winter

University position

Senior Lecturer

Dr Ian Winter is pleased to consider applications from prospective PhD students.

Departments

Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience

Email

imw1001@cam.ac.uk

Home page

http://www.pdn.cam.ac.uk/staff/w... (personal home page)

Research Themes

Systems and Computational Neuroscience

Cellular and Molecular Neuroscience

Interests

Primitive neural mechanisms of auditory scene analysis.

My research searches for neurophysiological correlates of the cues necessary for the segregation and fusion of auditory objects. This work is carried out in close collaboration with psychophysicists and computer modellers with the long term aim of producing a multi-channel, physiologically based model to explain auditory perception in terms of neural information processing.

Research Focus

Keywords

networks

auditory

brainstem

objects

neural circuit

Clinical conditions

Hearing and balance deficits

Sensorineural hearing loss

Tinnitus

Equipment

Computational modelling

Electrophysiological recording techniques

Collaborators

Cambridge

Bob Carlyon

Roy Patterson

United Kingdom

Ray Meddis Web: http://www.essex.ac.uk/psychol...

Brian Roberts Web: http://www.aston.ac.uk/lhs/sta...

International

Alain de Cheveigne Web: http://cognition.ens.fr/Auditio...

Helmy Mulders Web: http://www.physiol.biomedchem.uwa.edu.au/index.h...

Daniel Pressnitzer Web: http://cognition.ens.fr/Auditio...

Don Robertson Web: http://www.physiol.biomedchem.uwa.edu.au/index.h...

Jesko Verhey Web: http://medi.uni-oldenburg.de/members...

Associated News Items


    Key publications

    Pressnitzer D, Sayles M, Micheyl C, Winter IM (2008), “Perceptual organization of sound begins in the auditory periphery.” Curr Biol 18(15):1124-8 Details

    Sayles M, Winter IM (2008), “Ambiguous pitch and the temporal representation of inharmonic iterated rippled noise in the ventral cochlear nucleus.” J Neurosci 28(46):11925-38 Details

    Sayles M, Winter IM (2008), “Reverberation challenges the temporal representation of the pitch of complex sounds.” Neuron 58(5):789-801 Details