Professor Barry Keverne

Barry Keverne

University position

Professor

Professor Barry Keverne is pleased to consider applications from prospective PhD students.

Departments

Department of Zoology

Institutes

Sub-department of Animal Behaviour

Email

ebk10@cam.ac.uk

Home page

http://www.zoo.cam.ac.uk/zoostaf... (personal home page)

Research Themes

Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience

Developmental Neuroscience

Interests

Professor Keverne has long standing experience in behavioural neuroscience and has, in the past 10 years, brought molecular genetic techniques to focus on brain development and investigate how genetic perturbations of the brain influence brain function. In particular he has employed androgenetic and parthenogenetic chimeras to understand how the imprinted genome influences brain development and has extensively investigated the adult phenotype of mice carrying a mutation in paternally expressed genes. These studies have led to a co-adaptive evolutionary theory of brain and placental development through genomic imprinting. Pheromonal influences on behaviour and endocrine responses in mice is also a long standing interest and in recent years, together with Piers Emson, he has investigated pheromonal signalling via Erk and Akt phosphorylation to enhance vomeronasal neural regeneration survival.

(A) Western analysis of phosphorylated ERK signal in vomeronasal and CHO cells 10 min after application of urine (male and female urine adjusted to contain 5.0 µg/mL MUP protein, and artificial human urine contained with no MUP protein). C, control cells
(A) Western analysis of phosphorylated ERK signal in vomeronasal and CHO cells 10 min after application of urine (male and female urine adjusted to contain 5.0 µg/mL MUP protein, and artificial human urine contained with no MUP protein). C, control cells treated with PBS; MUP, mouse urinary protein fraction; M + L, MUP and ligand fractions applied together. Visualization of phosphorylated ERK immunoreactivity (B) and phosphorylated Akt immunoreactivity (C) in the vomeronasal cells following application of urine components for 10 min. The different urine fractions and components are shown below each panel. (D) Western analysis of phosphorylated ERK and Akt signal changes over time (8 h) in VNO cells after application of male or female urine (concentration adjusted to contain 5.0 µg/mL MUP protein), MUPs, MUPs + ligand and PBS control.
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Research Focus

Keywords

pheromones

brain evolution

genomic imprinting

hypothalamic development

neural circuit

Clinical conditions

Birth defects

Cognitive impairment

Genetic disorders

Hormonal disorders

Equipment

Affymetric genetic screening

Behavioural analysis

Confocal microscopy

Immunohistochemistry

Collaborators

Cambridge

Piers Emson

Azim Surani

International

Frances Champagne Web: http://cumc.columbia.edu/dept/ne...

Reinald Fundele Web: http://www.fu.uu.se/devbiol...

Key publications

Curley JP, Keverne EB (2005), “Genes, brains and mammalian social bonds” Trends Ecol Evol 20:561-567 Details

Curley JP, Pinnock SB, Dickson SL, Thresher R, Miyoshi N, Surani MA, Keverne EB (2005), “Increased body fat in mice with a targeted mutation of the paternally expressed imprinted gene Peg3” FASEB J 19:1302-1304 Details

Keverne EB (2005), “Odor here, odor there: chemosensation and reproductive function” Nat Neurosci 8:1637-1638 Details