Neuroscience in Cambridge

Many of the most significant and interesting challenges of the modern world require boundary-crossing collaborations

Alison Richard

Today, Cambridge’s distinctive genius is to be small, intimate and supportive; yet at the same time to be global, visionary and transformative.

Cambridge’s historic strength is overwhelmingly founded on individuals, and on a tradition of “letting a thousand flowers bloom”. But many of the most significant and interesting challenges of the modern world require boundary-crossing collaborations among scientists and scholars with widely different fields of expertise. The frontiers of neuroscience present just such a challenge.

I have watched with satisfaction and enthusiasm as Cambridge’s enormous but dispersed talents in neuroscience have come together to develop a vision for the future and a structure to support it, and to set out clear goals. These goals harness the energy and creativity of all the contributing individuals whose names you will find within these pages.

I wish the Cambridge Neuroscience initiative and their launch symposium every success, and I am confident that these mark the beginning of a transformational era in neuroscience here.

Alison Richard
Vice-chancellor